Blog Archives

Hulu model in flux

It appears that there is talk of changing Hulu’s current model. Instead of free-for-all streaming of content, they may be moving toward having viewers use their cable subscription credentials for authentication. In other words, Hulu will still be free if you have a cable subscription.

This is an obvious swipe at cord cutters, who immediately reference Hulu and Netflix when discussing how they get occasional television content. The idea is that by withholding Hulu from those who are not paying for cable, it will discourage future cord cutters and possibly persuade previous cord cutters to return to the fold. It’s not a bad plan in the long run. Without Hulu, how else are cord cutters going to watch Community? That’s what NBC Universal, owned by Comcast, is expecting. Read the rest of this entry

Advertisements

Consoles may become a thing of the past

Check out this article on ITProPortal: http://www.itproportal.com/2012/03/13/the-consoles-are-dying-says-developer/

Looking at the current trend, it’s hard to disagree. The mainstream consumer is definitely less likely to pick up an Xbox 360, PS3, Wii or (3)DS for casual gaming if Angry Birds or Plants vs. Zombies can be downloaded onto a device that has functionality beyond gaming. Not to mention the fact that the games each cost less than the average console title and will likely be supported over the course of several device upgrades. Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo cannot boast that sort of longevity for their $50+ games. Read the rest of this entry

Watch out for the entertainment industry’s future protective acts in the name of copyright

The least honest, most selfish, things a person can say these days are that information “wants” to be free and that online piracy does more good than harm as it concerns copyrighted material. These are items we most definitely want to believe are true but exist just outside that realm of possibility. Information in and of itself has aims that are as clear and discernible as the aims rocks have, and the biggest contribution of online piracy is the option of bringing to awareness, through experience, a consumer’s actual opinion of a copyrighted item – which, mind you, does not necessarily translate into sales.

It is time to stop romanticizing our free love for free access to products and look at this more objectively. Consumers who pirate copyrighted goods are not bastions of a future free world. By and large they are parasites on the system of consumer goods. This is a horrible position to be in because these are entertainment goods, far from necessities. The drive to obtain these items is based on want. That want is actually created by the entertainment industry itself through their marketing departments.

It is no wonder that the entertainment industry is so upset by the state of digital piracy today. It’s no wonder that they created SOPA and PIPA to tighten the reigns on what can be posted online. Granted, their response to the situation is pretty horrible. Claiming that the bills were shot down as a result of a grassroots misinformation from the “copyleft” is a far cry from the reality – a strong reaction to a bill that gave an already powerful industry more control in the ill-defined but currently open world of the internet.

To an extent, though, the entertainment industry is right. Read the rest of this entry

Louis CK takes matters into his own hands

What Louis CK knows that most media companies don’t — Tech News and Analysis.

This is the opening salvo for which I’ve been waiting. The war on traditional media distribution has begun, and content creators finally have someone to prop up as an example of success. By the time this post is released, Louis CK has made over $500,000 on his stand up act. It must be noted that he offered it to consumers for $5 in a DRM-free digital format. He has claimed over $200,000 of that for himself. The rest goes to the website, production, etc. The whole venture was a gamble that paid off. Read the rest of this entry

Netflix reveals people’s first-world problems

Read Netflix’s blog post about the change in their service rates!

It has only been a day, but there is a large outcry over the fact that Netflix plans to introduce new subscriptions and change the rates of their old subscriptions. The biggest news is that people have the choice of having only one DVD out at a time for $8 or just stream online for $8. To combine the two plans is roughly $16 a month. That currently costs about $10 a month, so I guess there’s a little room for complaint. Read the rest of this entry

Building Cult Status

I'm not giving anything away about next year's top pick...

The idea of a cult classic film or television series has been bothering me lately. If one really thinks about it, it’s more of a marketing term than anything else. According to Wikipedia, a cult film is one that ” that has acquired a highly devoted but specific group of fans.” By that definition alone, almost any film (or piece of art) can technically acquire cult status so long as two people really like it. The article goes on to say that not everything goes on to acquire cult status for a multitude of reasons. To this I have to ask Why? Why are lesser known films that a handful of people like not automatically cult classics? The answer is recognition. Read the rest of this entry

Why are movies failing?

My friend Kaz linked me to an article about decreased movie attendance (and featured an image of Sucker Punch to indicate its one of the flops), which linked me to an article about decreased movie attendance (featuring an image of Red Riding Hood to indicate a flop), which finally linked me to an article about CinemaCon and the shared discussion of executives in the movie business who think that the problem with movie attendance is the product. They cite other factors such as economic woes, the price of gas, and the increased prices of movie tickets and concessions, but they narrowed in on the product itself. To some extent, this is exciting news. It means people in the movie industry are taking responsibility for the product they’re releasing. Read the rest of this entry

Geist: Canadian-backed report says music, movie, and software piracy is a market failure, not a legal one – thestar.com

Geist: Canadian-backed report says music, movie, and software piracy is a market failure, not a legal one – thestar.com.

Well, duh. Better pricing and distribution models would lead to better sales and a greater appreciation of legal acquisition. Suing people for thousands of dollars for downloading content that costs only tens of dollars will only lead to a lack of appreciation for the distributors, and it leads to more secretive illegal acquisition attempts. But if you treat your consumers with some decency, chances are they’ll treat your product the way you want.

Movie tickets sales were very low last year, and I had the foresight to post why

Last year I caught wind of an article explaining the then imminent movie ticket price hike and wrote a post about it. Within the post I suggested that people start boycotting the theatres until ticket prices drop, but I also suggested that doing so was petty. However, I made a particularly worthwhile statement that bears repeating: “They do not seem to understand that hiking up the prices because people are going will eventually lead to people not going.” Read the rest of this entry

Is Netflix the future, or will we suffer the wrath of cable companies?

This blog, I assure you, presents absolutely no bias

Netflix has certainly proven itself to be quite the versatile and progressive business in its mere decade of existence. Not only has it all but completely shut down the brick and mortar video rental chains Blockbuster Video and Hollywood Video, but it has firmly entrenched itself among the most popular streaming video content providers online. It seems the company has recently become a threat to cable television and television networks because of its offering easy access to video content. Read the rest of this entry