Monthly Archives: June 2011

Ultimate Spider-Man 160: My god, it’s full of holes

At least it's not titled "Spider-Man No More", right?

I have to admit that I have been a fan of Ultimate Spider-Man for at least five years, maybe longer. For some reason, people complain about the writing of Brian Bendis. People used to complain about the decompressed storylines requiring three issues to tell one story – rather than one issue per story or the blended storylines that have become the Marvel vogue since the launch of the Ultimate line of comics. I love Ultimate Spider-Man. I even stuck with the story after the change of status quo in Ultimatum. It was interesting and seemingly going somewhere.

Then came the “Death of Spider-Man” storyline, which was tied into the ever interesting but hyper-compressed Ultimate Comics Avengers vs. New Ultimates books. This does not retroactively eliminate my love for this specific Spider-Man title, but the legacy of the book is lost. Not because killing Spider-Man is horrid. It isn’t at all when it is done poignantly. When you kill the heart of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, you better make sure to bring your A-game. Unfortunately, they did not. Read the rest of this entry

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Can we ignore Ebert now?

Poor taste isn’t reporting the facts on whether or not someone was definitely drinking and driving. Poor taste is trying to make a cute joke hours after the death of someone’s loved one. This is the utter definition of “Too soon.”

What happened? Well, hours after the reported death of Jackass‘ Ryan Dunn, Ebert twatted, “Friends don’t let jackasses drink and drive.” It is true that Dunn had been drinking before getting in the car, but making it a point to crudely and pejoratively use the name of the show in a message to the masses was beyond unnecessary. It is snide and judgmental. What it should tell the world is that Ebert is a prick. Unfortunately, as I caught wind of the message on EW.com, it just puts the wind in the sails of other pricks.

We know that drinking and driving is dangerous behavior. It’s not a public service announcement. Be happy Twatter wasn’t around when Walt Disney died. Hours after the announcement of his death you might have encountered message like, “Smoking is dangerous. There isn’t much you can do about an Epcot-sized tumor in your lungs.”

I know that this message draws unnecessary attention to him, but from here on can we just ignore Ebert? It seems he knows he is on his last legs and his relevance is fading fast. The man does not make public appearances and cannot speak. All he has are his reviews and observations. Only when there is some sort of controversy for being snide (such as saying video games are not art) does anyone pay him any serious mind anymore. So let’s just stop responding to him.

Especially since a statement like that makes him a bigger jackass than some dude who put a toy car up his butt.

Green Lantern’s light

My sequel pitch: Call the next one "Green Lantern Corps", and then live up to that name. Total space opera with as few Earth elements as possible.

Green Lantern was a good movie. Despite what the critics say, it was a fun movie with steady performances. It is far from the best movie ever made or the best superhero movie…or even the best movie consisting of approximately 60% CGI. In fact, the movie reeks of having been an idea that Warner Bros. had to put out because there were no other DC movies slated to come out during Marvel’s big summer. When they realized that they were up against fine quality productions, they delayed the release of Green Lantern to increase the effects budget. But despite this, the movie was enjoyable. I saw the light of willpower. Read the rest of this entry

Love Wins – a cultural commentary

An early anecdote recorded in Rob Bell’s controversial book, Love Wins, is of an art exhibit hosted at Bell’s church. A member of the church made a painting that incorporated quotes by Gandhi that as moving to other members of the church. Bell really appreciated it, but he didn’t appreciate that later on another church member affixed a note reading, “Too bad he’s going to burn in Hell.” Bell’s book is a response to people who praise the exclusivity of heaven and make it a point to judge people openly.

And in reflecting on this, I realize that the book isn’t just about how poorly behaved some Christians can be. This is a commentary on our culture in general. Read the rest of this entry

X-Men: First Class – racial tensions

Only white people need apply. Or blue if you're white underneath or spend most of your time looking white.

My displeasure with the rest of the X-Men film franchise almost led me to not seeing X-Men: First Class, despite the early good reviews. Social stimulation brought me out to see it, and I was pleasantly surprised. Unfortunately, it did not make up for the Wolverine-centered focus in the first three films, the utter banality of X-Men, the almost good film ruined by a completely ridiculously stupid ending that was X-2 (seriously, the X-Men are trained to be a team, so it doesn’t make sense that Jean Gray would fight a tidal wave by herself when Storm can send a strong wind against it, Iceman can freeze water, and Cyclops’ blasts are actually a physical force…), the complete miss that was X-Men 3, or the existence of X-Men Origins: Wolverine. But it was a clever movie in that it was a period piece and mixed a tiny bit of the spy genre into the plot. It almost made the film seem classy.

Almost. Read the rest of this entry

Thoughts on the DCnU

I get a surprising number of hits here because of the thoughts I shared on Tim Drake as Red Robin two years ago. I haven’t had much to say since then because the book started taking a nosedive shortly thereafter. Need I also mention that the book got even worse after Bruce Wayne was recovered from his trip through time? The character has stayed strong throughout, but everything around him hasn’t been worth reading.

Of course I can only say this after having read it, which is unfortunate…

I am beginning to think that this is DC Comics to a T. By that I mean that they have strong characters in stupid and uninteresting storylines. Look at it this way: DC characters are iconic and incredibly well known, but how many must-read stories have they published in the past decade? Aside from Identity Crisis and the epic Green Lantern stories, nothing.

This week I learned of DC’s plans to reboot their entire universe in the Fall. Read the rest of this entry